Pope Francis and Kim Davis, PR disaster

The Vatican has said explicitly that Pope Francis’s meeting with Kim Davis does not mean that the Pope shares her views or supports her cause. Considering that he met privately with a lot of people, including a married gay couple, this is good enough for me. I am relieved. But a lot of people aren’t. This Pope has a deep reserve of goodwill to draw on, and this one issue has already exhausted it for many. I can’t blame them. On a trip meant solely to cultivate goodwill in America, how could Pope Francis have gone so wrong?

The Kim Davis meeting is not about doctrine. On gay people and the Church, this Pope differs only subtly from his predecessors and I don’t expect him to change. The Kim Davis meeting is, however, about effective (or in this case disastrous) propaganda. As a propagandist, this Pope differs substantially from his predecessor. Francis is quite good at it, while Benedict XVI seemed to wander around in a self-created negative charisma zone. Being a skilled propagandist is a core competency for any modern Pope.

How you frame the teachings of the Church makes a great deal of difference in the lives of the world’s billion Catholics and those in contact with them. As a gay person, I feel safer in the world because of Francis’s tone, even though I know he doesn’t support gay marriage. But because of how he talk ands acts, I know he is not afraid of gay people, that he does not hate them, and that in this he could be a model for Christians everywhere. Tolerance in a Pope is no small thing.

Propaganda is a core part of the Papal job description, and I am using the word in its purest sense, meaning the propagation of a set of ideas. The Roman Catholic Church quite literally invented propaganda. The word first appears in the title of a Vatican department created in 1622 by Pope Gregory XV, the Congregatio de propaganda fide, i.e., the Congregation for the propagation, or spreading, of the faith. The Pope doesn’t need to travel to be a chief executive or a spiritual leader. When he travels, he is being a charismatic salesman. And, up until the Kim Davis meeting, Francis was doing such a good job. I don’t mean that he has been good at converting people, though he may have been, but that he has been removing huge amounts of religious tension in the world.

By talking about greed and pride more than sexual sins, this Pope is putting the Church back on track. Sexual morality has always been a Christian concern, but it has rarely been what it has seemed like recently, a sole obsession. To be arrogant and greedy has always been far worse than to be gluttonous or sexually unorthodox. By shutting up about gay marriage and talking about the environment, social justice, and the ravages of unrestrained capitalism, the Pope is reminding people of this. Emphasis and tone can be a clue to the real subtleties of the Christian message. If this makes social conservatives in America uncomfortable, great. If this makes marginalized people more hopeful, even better. In both cases, the change of emotion is richly deserved.

So how on earth could a Pope who was doing such a good job at this subtle but important shift in messaging allow himself to meet with Kim Davis? She represents the old guard Republican- Catholic (though she herself is a Protestant) obsession with sexual sin to the point of hatred and intolerance. Kim Davis is one part of the Christian teaching isolated and turned into a hateful obsession, everything Francis has so skillfully walked away from. So, what happened?

It seems that she was on a list of people cleared by the Vatican’s embassy in Washington, D.C. Getting a rosary and a blessing, as Davis did, was not a special privilege, but a kindness the Pope extended to everybody he met with. It’s too bad Francis didn’t seem to know the political context of Kim Davis. Perhaps he didn’t expect her to crassly use a private meeting for public gain. But when you are a world leader, this is the sort of thing you have to look out for, especially when a huge part of your job is PR. And if this Pope didn’t know whom he was meeting, then somebody on his staff or on the Vatican embassy’s staff seriously fell down on the job. I agree that there are far more important issues globally than Kim Davis, but she should be on your radar when you are on a goodwill trip to America.

Personally, I am relieved that Francis has made clear that he doesn’t endorse Davis. But both personally and professionally (as a media person), I am baffled that he and his staff got themselves into a situation where they had to make such a statement in the first place. The organization that literally invented PR 393 years ago should know better.

The HBO-Sesame Street deal is not a reason to privatize public television

The Nation

Ever since its creation in the late 1960s, public broadcasting in the US has been under attack. The attacks have come mostly from conservatives, but liberals have not been above them, either, and the debate usually flares up when there is a change in the funding for NPR and PBS, either in amount or source. The new partnership between HBO and Sesame Street is the latest such flare up. Usually, Big Bird gets held up as a symbol for all of public broadcasting, but in this case, he and his pals are actually at the center of the debate.

In my latest for The Nation, my co-author and I argue that the Sesame Street deal, while good for the iconic children’s show, is a bad model for the rest of PBS programs. When it comes to providing educational resources for all Americans, privatization isn’t the way to go. Click on the bird for the full piece.

The Talking Head

Back in the autumn, CCTV America asked me to come on their business newscast and talk about the EU’s “right to be forgotten” law. Since then, I’ve been on to talk about the social effects of media. Verdict: being on TV is fun.

I try to remember everything I can about the right to be forgotten.

I try to remember everything I can about the right to be forgotten.

I talk about why Internet access is now governed by

I talk about why Internet access is now governed by “common carrier” law, and what that means.

For Kyle

Once on a rock by the sea sat five boys singing. I was one of the boys and so was my friend Kyle Billing. The others were bashful at first, but Kyle and I raised our voices and soon everybody joined in. Against the sound of the crashing surf we sang unselfconsciously, anything we could remember: “A Fugue for Tinhornsfrom Guys and Dolls, “Be Our Guest!” from Beauty and the Beast, and Row, Row, Row Your Boat. We recited tongue twisters and lines from movies, told stupid jokes, and argued about the existence of God. After the sun set, we crossed a dark road by starlight and stayed up late in the beach house, talking and playing games.

I was fifteen and a freshman, and the other boys were seniors in their first summer of life after high school. I had been allowed into their circle by its leader, a dashing blond boy who had been both captain of the tennis team and the lead in the spring musical. I idolized that group as my high school’s artistic elite. One of them designed lighting for the school plays, another played the jazz saxophone and had read everything, another had a caustic wit, and another wrote a column for the school paper. Kyle painted and drew and he was good. His paintings not only looked like what they were supposed to, but they had style. Looking back, I imagine that I was tolerated by that bunch more with kindness than real affection, but with Kyle I remember always feeling like an equal.

He was tall and slender, with floppy brown hair which he was always running his fingers through in a kind of befuddlement with everything. He managed to crack everybody up without quite trying to. His impression of Steve Martin as Ruprecht from Dirty Rotten Scoundrels cracks me up even now. In a school of sunny courtyards and boys in athletic gear, Kyle gave me permission to sit in the shade in rumpled khakis and a black blazer. (more…)

At NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, the Future is in Play

Back in the Spring, I took up an offer to take a backstage tour of NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, aka “The Center for the Recently Possible.” I think of it as a Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory of new media and technology graduate programs. What the kids there are doing is what we’ll all be thinking about or plugging into in the near future.

My strategy was to hang around with a notebook, bug the students standing next to crazy looking contraptions, and write down what they said that I could (mostly) comprehend. The result was this piece for PBS MediaShift. Did I stumble on any everlasting gobstoppers? You be the judge.

http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2014/08/three-eye-opening-days-at-nyus-itp-the-center-for-the-recently-possible/

At the Huffington Post, I say why Google’s removal of news links in the EU is a good thing

homepage.gifI’m not in favor of censorship. But I do believe that the questions raised by the “right to be forgotten” highlight our need for noncommercial search, or for making sure there is more than just one dominant player.

Read the full story here.